#66          Isolation  ch 19

Last Update: February 5, 2015

OK PASS Objectives

        "Big Four"   
leaders after WW I


President Wilson (U.S.)
Prime Minister David Lloyd George   of England,
Premier Georges Clemenceau  of France,

and Prime Minister Vittorio Orlando of Italy.

Content Standard 3.

B. Examine the reasons why the United States did not join the League of Nations and for the nation's return to isolationism (e.g., Wilson’s Fourteen Points and the Treaty of Versailles).

   

The Armistice (cease fire)

stopped the fighting of WWI

Armistice signed November 11, 1918 11:00 am.

Content Standard 3.

2. Evaluate the causes and effects of World War I on American politics, economy, and society.

Treaty of Versailles : Peace treaty that followed WWI ... 
    1.  Germany lost overseas colonial possessions
    2.  Germany was demilitarized
    3.  Germany must pay reparations $
         and admit guilt

    Germany protested the Treaty, but had
little choice in signing.  Especially humiliated
at having to accept total responsibility for the war.

Watch Preswilson video start at 3:34 and finish

Content Standard 3.
B. Examine the reasons why the United States did not join the League of Nations and for the nation's return to isolationism (e.g., Wilson’s Fourteen Points and the Treaty of Versailles).

Map of Europe is redrawn :

Europe before WWI

 

                                                                                                                                   Watch Penicillin 4 min video

The "Lost Generation" defines a sense of moral loss or aimlessness apparent in literary figures during the 1920s. World War I seemed to have destroyed the idea that if you acted virtuously, good things would happen. Many good, young men went to war and died, or returned home either physically or mentally wounded (for most, both), and their faith in the moral guideposts that had earlier given them hope, were no longer valid...they were "Lost."

Pro 3:5-6 “Trust in the Lord with all your heart; and don't lean on your own understanding. In all things acknowledge him, and he shall direct your way.

Results of WWI

64 million were mobilized (wore a uniform)

10 million soldiers died

20 million were wounded

6 million were missing or unaccounted for.

Average loss of life each day was 15,000

Civilian deaths equalled
                  the deaths on the battlefield (16 mil)

Altogether 32 mil died from the war    WWI Pics

 

 

Cost of the war $ over 351 bil dollars or 9 mil $ per hour.

 

League of Nations  this was Wilson's
14th point calling for a world "League of nations" to maintain peace.  

U. S. Senate did not even ratify, and the United States never joined the League of Nations. 

See 14th Point below.

   

 

Content Standard 4: The student will describe the social; cultural; economic; and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.

A. Evaluate literature, music, dance, and forms of entertainment of the 1920s and 1930s

the “Lost Generation,”

 

 

 

Content Standard 3.

2. Evaluate the causes and effects of World War I on American politics, economy, and society.
and the effects of the war on the United States (e.g., mobilization, propaganda, women in the workplace, and the First Red Scare).
B. Examine the reasons why the United States did not join the League of Nations and for the nation's return to isolationism

Do not write all of these notes down about the 14 points.
    Fourteen Points, name given to the proposals of President Woodrow Wilson designed to establish the basis for a just and lasting peace following the victory of the Allies in World War I. The 14 proposals were contained in Wilson's address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on January 8, 1918. The idealism expressed in them was widely acclaimed and gave Wilson a position of moral leadership among the Allied leaders. Opposition to various points on the part of the European Allies, however, developed at the conclusion of hostilities, and the attempt at practical application of the 14 points exposed a multilateral system of secret agreements between the European victors. In order to secure support of his 14th, and most important, point, which called for the creating of an "association of nations," Wilson was compelled to abandon his insistence upon the acceptance of his full program. Wilson's 14th point was realized in the League of Nations, established as a result of the Paris Peace Conference (1919).

In summary, the 14 points were as follows: (1) abolition of secret diplomacy by open covenants, openly arrived at; (2) freedom of the seas in peace and war, except as the seas may be closed in whole or part by international action for enforcement of international covenants; (3) removal of international trade barriers wherever possible and establishment of an equality of trade conditions among the nations consenting to the peace; (4) reduction of armaments consistent with public safety; (5) adjustment of colonial disputes consistent with the interests of both the controlling government and the colonial population; (6) evacuation of Russian territory, with the proviso of self-determination; (7) evacuation and restoration of Belgium; (8) evacuation and restoration of French territory, including AlsaceLorraine-; (9) readjustment of Italian frontiers along clearly recognizable lines of nationality; (10) autonomy for the peoples of Austria-Hungary; (11) evacuation and restoration of territory to Serbia, Montenegro, and Romania, granting of seaports to Serbia, and readjustment and international guarantee of the national ambitions of the Balkan nations; (12) self-determination for non-Turkish peoples under Turkish control and internationalization of the Dardanelles; (13) an independent Poland, with access to the sea; and (14) creation of a general association of nations under specific covenants to give mutual guarantees of political independence and territorial integrity.

(e.g., Wilson’s Fourteen Points and the Treaty of Versailles).
   

Photo Credits:

Europe before WWI : http://www.wwnorton.com/college/history/ralph/ralimage/map34wwi.jpg