#67  Normalcy and Naivete  ch 20

Last Update: February 18, 2015

OK PASS Objectives

 "Return to Normalcy"  Why was this the campaign slogan of Warren Harding?  p 468 Americans were ready to return
to pre-WWI life

A return to isolationism: Americans were tired of war.
(mouse over pic below)

How?

Content Standard 4: The student will describe the social; cultural; economic; and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.
1. Compare and contrast cultural, economic, and social events and trends between the World Wars.

1. Kellogg-Briand Pact:  AKA Paris Peace Pact   1926

agreement outlawed war, noble idea, no way to enforce the pact unless you go to war.

The general consensus at the time was that getting involved in world affairs was a big mistake and could only trigger another European war. All presidents after Wilson kept to the policy, mostly, until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941.

 

2. Economic Entrapment WWI debts-reparations problem look at map on page 471
US got paid back with their own money!!
World leaders sought peace through disarmament.

 3.  Washington Naval Conference:   Tried Limitation
                     of Arms and Established Power Treaties  1922

                a.  four power treaty ( 1921 US, England, Japan, France)

                b.  five power treaty ( 1922 US, England, Japan, Italy, France)

                c.  nine power treaty (1922 United States, Japan, China, France,
                                                                                      Great Britain, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands, and Portugal
)

        All of these treaties limited the tonnage, arms and standing army a country could have (lacked enforcement power)

 

4.  World Court  @ The Hague, Netherlands tried to settle disputes between member nations

 
America : Post-WW I
In spite of her postwar problems, the nation was bright with hope for the future. 
1. Booming postwar economy brought prosperity and
2. the possibility of a better
fuller life for many Americans.
 

flapper: a woman that is a non-conformist

Typical flapper dress 1920s

Content Standard 4: The student will describe the social; cultural; economic; and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.
1. Compare and contrast cultural, economic, and social events and trends between the World Wars.
A. Evaluate literature, music, dance, and forms of entertainment of the 1920s and 1930s (e.g., the Harlem Renaissance, the Jazz Age, flappers, the “Lost Generation,” and “talkies”).

   Post-WW I (Unrest)
Russian Revolution

    started by Vladimir Lenin 1917  

 
 Red Scare 
In 1917 Lenin and his Communist forces
took control of Russia and formed the Third International, an organization dedicated to world wide Communist revolution.
Content Standard 3.
A. Analyze the factors leading to the involvement of the United States in World War I (e.g., the alliance systems , submarine warfare , and the Zimmerman Note ) and the effects of the war on the United States (e.g., mobilization, propaganda, women in the workplace , and the First Red Scare.

1.  Fear of a Communist Revolution gripped many Americans  AKA Red Scare

     Green Corn Rebellion in Oklahoma where socialist tried to overthrow the government
2.  Sacco-Vanzetti  court case.

    the two Italians convicted of Murder.  Liberal and radicals claimed they were martyrs and died because of their political beliefs.
                         Watch Sacco Vanzetti 10 min video :

 

(e.g., mobilization, propaganda, women in the workplace , and the First Red Scare.

 

Photo Credits:

Harding: http://www.hudsonlibrary.org/hudson%20website/Images/Web%20Collection/Pins/WarrenGHarding.jpg

Kellog Peace Pact: http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/collections/lon-un/league_era/kellogg/docs/kelloggph4781.jpg

World Court: http://ketsjup.com/images/vredespaleis.jpg

Third International: http://libcom.org/files/third%20int.jpg

Green Corn Rebellion: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3601/3585320813_7f61f0e522.jpg?v=0

Sacco Vanzetti: http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/m_r/millay/sacvan.jpg