#70  Roaring Twenties  ch 20

Last Update: November 14, 2015

OK PASS Objectives

The 1920s was an age of

`fads and foolishness
    1.  Sporty roadsters and raccoon coats were the rage
   2.  Flappers were women who tried to look liberated from the traditional role of women

Content Standard 4:
The student will describe the social; cultural; economic; and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.
1. Compare and contrast cultural, economic, and social events and trends between the World Wars.

3.  Marathon records were set:
     kiss, dance, flag pole sitting

Content Standard 4:

A. Evaluate literature, music, dance, and forms of entertainment of the 1920s and 1930s

1920s became the age of the airplane, with Charles Lindbergh becoming the first  to fly solo across the Atlantic in 1927.

Watch Lindbergh video 5 min video:

Content Standard 4: The student will describe the social; cultural; economic; and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.
C. Analyze the impact of aviation e.g., Charles Lindbergh, on American society.

 

Golden Age of Sports  p 475-476
    List 6 sports heros of the 1920s and their accomplishment
Jim Thorpe,    Greatest olympian of the 20th century
Babe Ruth,      home run king 714 homers
Bobby Jones,   greatest golfer of his day
Red Grange,    famous college and pro football player and coach
Jack Dempsey,
heavy weight boxing champion
Knute Rockne, famous football coach
 

                                                                                                                    Watch OU v. Boise State 2006 bowl game 2 min video
Has violence in sports gone to far? 

Watch Miami v. FIU 2006 football fight 1.5 min video

 

 

Social Unrest-  
    KKK  -  Racist group in opposition to minority groups as
                 (BENO Lodge)
  be no Jews, Catholics, blacks,  immigrants.

The Back-to-Africa movement, also known as the Colonization movement, originated in the United States in the 19th century, and encouraged those of African descent to return to the African homelands of their ancestors. This movement would eventually inspire other movements ranging from the Nation of Islam to the Rastafari movement.

 

Content Standard 4: The student will describe the social; cultural; economic; and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.

D. Describe rising racial tensions and labor unrest common in the era (e.g., the Tulsa Race Riot, the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, the “Back to Africa” Movement and Marcus Garvey,

The Harlem Renaissance was a cultural movement that spanned the 1920s and 1930s. At the time, it was known as the "New Negro Movement" centered in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City,

Historians call this the zenith of this "flowering of Negro literature"

The Harlem Renaissance and the 1920s embodied a great deal of jazz music. Negros—at least affluent Negros felt like they should “assimilate into the white business culture” of the large cities.

Content Standard 4:
The student will describe the social; cultural; economic; and technological ideas and events in the United States in the era between the World Wars.

1. Compare and contrast cultural, economic, and social events and trends between the World Wars

A. Evaluate literature, music, dance, and forms of entertainment of the 1920s and 1930s (e.g., the Harlem Renaissance

   

Watch FBI Agent Ness 2 min video:

     Organized Crime
    1.  Al Capone,  AKA scarface, and his gang  "muscled in" on crime in Chicago

   2. Bonnie and Clyde bank robbing duo 

3.  Elliot Ness and his "Untouchables" fought organized crime during the 1920s.

 

Content Standard 4:
A. Evaluate the impact of the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl (e.g., migration of the Okies and exodusters), and the New Deal economic policies on business and agriculture, as well as on the American people, their culture and political behavior..

For years Capone remained immune to prosecution for his criminal activities. In June 1930, after an exhaustive investigation by the federal government, Capone was indicted for income tax evasion. One of the most notorious criminals of the 20th century--the man held most responsible for the bloody lawlessness of Prohibition-era Chicago--was imprisoned for tax evasion.
Content Standard 4:
A. Evaluate the impact of the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl (e.g., migration of the Okies and exodusters), and the New Deal economic policies on business and agriculture, as well as on the American people, their culture and political behavior..
What was the St. Valentines Day Massacre? p 479
Members of Capone's gang dressed up like policemen and gunned down members of a rival gang.

                                                                                             Watch St Valentines Day Massacre 7.3 min video:

See Easy Eddie story below.
 
STORY NUMBER ONE

> Many years ago, Al Capone virtually owned Chicago. Capone wasn't famous for anything heroic. He was notorious for enmeshing the windy city in everything from bootlegged booze and prostitution to murder.
   Capone had a lawyer nicknamed "Easy Eddie." He was his lawyer
for a good reason. Eddie was very good!  In fact, Eddie's skill at legal maneuvering kept Big Al out of jail for a long time. To show his appreciation, Capone paid him very well. Not only was the money big, but Eddie got special dividends. For instance, he and his family occupied a fenced-in mansion with live-in help and all  of the conveniences of the day. The estate was so large that it filled an entire Chicago City block. Eddie lived the high life of the Chicago mob and gave little consideration to the atrocity that went on around him.  Eddie did have one soft spot, however. He had a son that he loved dearly. Eddie saw to it that his young son had the best of everything: clothes, cars and a good education.  Nothing was withheld. Price was no object.  And, despite his involvement with organized crime, Eddie even tried to teach him right from wrong. Eddie wanted his son to be a better man than he was. Yet, with all his wealth and influence, there were two things he couldn't give his son; that he couldn't pass on a good  name and a good example.

One day, Easy Eddie reached a difficult decision. Easy Eddie wanted to rectify wrongs he had done. He decided he would go to the authorities and tell the truth about Al "Scarface" Capone, clean up his tarnished name and offer his son some semblance of integrity.
To do this, he would have to testify against The Mob, and he knew that the cost would be great. So, he testified. Within the year, Easy Eddie's life ended in a blaze of gunfire on a lonely Chicago Street. But in his eyes, he had given his! son the greatest gift he had to offer, at the greatest price he would ever pay.

STORY NUMBER TWO

World War II produced many heroes. One such man was Lieutenant Commander Butch O'Hare. He was a fighter pilot assigned to the aircraft carrier Lexington in the South Pacific.  One day his entire squadron was sent on a mission. After he was airborne, he looked at his fuel gauge and realized that someone had forgotten to top off his fuel tank.  He would not have enough fuel to complete his mission and get back to his ship. His flight leader told him to return to the carrier.  Reluctantly, he dropped out of formation and headed back to the fleet.  As he was returning to the mother ship he saw something that turned his blood cold. A squadron of Japanese aircraft were speeding their way toward the American fleet.
The American fighters were gone on a sortie, and the fleet was all but defenseless. He couldn't reach his squadron and bring them back in time to save the fleet. Nor could he warn the fleet of the approaching danger.  There was only one thing to do. He must somehow divert them from the fleet.
Laying aside all thoughts of personal safety, he dove into the formation of Japanese planes. Wing-mounted 50 caliber's blazed as he charged in, attacking one surprised enemy plane and then another. Butch wove in and out of the now broken formation and fired at as many planes as possible until all his ammunition was finally spent. Undaunted, he continued the assault. He dove at the planes, trying to clip a wing or tail in hopes of damaging as many enemy planes as possible and rendering them  unfit to fly.
Finally, the exasperated Japanese squadron took off in another direction. Deeply relieved, Butch O'Hare and his tattered fighter
limped back to the carrier. Upon arrival he reported in and related 
the event surrounding his return.
The film from the gun-camera mounted on his plane told the tale! . It showed the extent of Butch's daring attempt to protect his fleet. He had in fact destroyed five enemy aircraft.
This took place on February 20, 1942, and for that action Butch became the Navy's first Ace of W.W.II, and the first Naval Aviator to win the Congressional Medal of Honor. A year later Butch was killed in aerial combat at the age of 29. His home town would not allow the memory of this WW II hero to fade, and today, O'Hare Airport in Chicago is named in tribute to the courage of this great man. So the next time you find yourself at 'Hare International, give some thought to visiting Butch's memorial displaying his statue and his Medal of Honor. It's located between Terminals one and two.

SO WHAT DO THESE TWO STORIES HAVE TO DO WITH EACH OTHER?

Butch O'Hare was Easy Eddie's son.
 
   

Photo Credits:

Bonnie and Clyde: http://condodomain.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/bonnie-clyde-belgravia.jpg